The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is looking for information on the trends and future investment needs for eight emerging technology sectors to complete a study authorized in the fiscal year (FY) 2021 appropriations act, according to a request for information (RFI) posted to the Federal Register.

Cybersecurity

To help universities protect COVID-19 research, Reps. Andy Barr, R-Ky., and Frank Lucas, R-Okla., introduced legislation to give those universities and research institutions tools to protect from cyberattacks by foreign cyber actors.






The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) released a discussion draft version of the upcoming NIST Privacy Framework on Wednesday, May 1, with principles and practices aligned with the NIST Cybersecurity Framework.






Cybersecurity

Cybersecurity training and education programs need to emphasize systems engineering perspectives in order to fully understand system vulnerabilities, said leaders from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) during an Oct. 10 webinar hosted by the agency’s National Initiative for Cybersecurity Education (NICE).






vote voting elections

The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) is the latest in a string of organizations to release its recommendations on how Federal, state, and local officials can best secure U.S. elections, including the use of paper-ballot components.






Last week, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) revealed the initial public draft of its Special Publication 800-160 Volume 2, Systems Security Engineering: Cyber Resiliency Considerations for the Engineering of Trustworthy Secure Systems.






Password manager company, Dashlane, has added a twist with its list of the “Worst Password Offenders” of 2017, naming high-profile people and organizations that fell into the bad-password trap. President Trump was deemed the worst offender, primarily because of simple passwords reportedly used by cabinet members and policy directors. Outside parties were also the culprits for the Department of Defense, specifically for its contractor, Booz Allen, as well as the Republican Party (stemming from a careless data analytics firm). Paul Manafort, for using “Bond007” as a password, and Sean Spicer, for apparently tweeting his passwords, also came in for scorn.






By Halloween, the National Institute of Standards and Technology will have completed a rough draft for Smart City frameworks throughout the country.






Stay Connected

Twitterfacebook